Sunday, May 08, 2005

Le Monde, Betjeman, NY, and Lucien Goldman?


Visited the amazing Casasola show at El Museo del Barrio, which I'm currently reviewing. As I'm going to do so in 'public', I'll save comment here. But it's a really wonderful show.
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Came across an interesting story from Le Monde from a while back, in a pile of old newspapers. Turns out it's also posted online:
Esclaves volontaires du téléphone portable.

Besides a catchy standfirst [Illusoire liberté, Immense marché], it's got such gems like:

...les Américains effectuent 1,1 milliard de voyages par jour, dont 87 % dans des véhicules privés

Rien qu’aux Etats-Unis, entre 40 et 50 millions de téléphones sont jetés chaque année

Dans une société où les loisirs et le labeur sont répartis de manière inégale entre les classes, où l’allongement de la durée du travail, notamment aux Etats-Unis, le chômage, la destruction des services publics rendent
plus pénibles la vie des habitants, ils se tournent vers la communication mobile pour tenter de surmonter, individuellement, des difficultés quotidiennes insaisissables autant qu’écrasantes.

The section about cars made me think of these lines from a Betjeman poem:
Let's say goodbye to hedges
And roads with grassy edges
And winding country lanes;
Let all things travel faster
Where motor car is master
Till only Speed remains.

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Brit novelist David Flusfeder publishes in FT Weekend a piece on 'the lost soul'of NY. It's an interesting follow-up piece to the previous FT piece on the closing of CBGB'S and the loss of 'counter'-cultural spaces. Together the two pieces pretty much add up to the piece I've been [not]writing for the last month about how the NY real estate market is killing NY's cultural life.......still, its an interesting piece.

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Came across two old books that I'd forgotten about, but both worth a mention:

The Wager of Lucien Goldman by Mitchell Cohen,reviewed here.

Disseminating Darwinism, especially Eric Anderson's chapter fascinating chapter "Black Responses to Darwinism"

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